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The Brookings Institution has released new information on how long it will take to get back to pre-recession employment levels.

As Chris Otts at the C-J puts it:

…even with incredibly robust growth of 472,000 jobs a month (that’d be more than four times the number of jobs added last month), it would still take until late 2013 or early 2014 to recover about 11.8 million jobsand return the job market to pre-Recession level.

Under a more realistic — but still optimistic — assumption of 208,100 new jobs a month (that’s based on 2005, the best year for job growth during the last decade), it would take until 2022.

Louisville has made two new national lists.

Mother Earth magazine says Derby City is one of the “Great Places You (Maybe) Never Heard Of.”

Perhaps employers haven’t heard of Louisville either, because the city is one of Careercast.com’s worst places to find a job.

In Kentucky, Goodwill has seen a 24% increase in the number of people it placed in jobs.

From Business First:

“When unemployment is high, it is even more difficult for people with disabilities or other disadvantages to find employment,” Roland R. Blahnik, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Kentucky, said in the news release. “The economic conditions challenged our ability to place people into jobs, but with continuous effort, placements are returning to prior levels. Even with this success, we’re seeing many more people come to Goodwill for assistance in finding jobs.”

Forbes Magazine has ranked Louisville the 38th overall best city for working mothers. The city falls just below Philadelphia and San Antonio, but tops Kansas City, Mo., Nasvhille and several cities in Florida.

Of particular interest is Louisville’s position at the bottom (tied with Oklahoma City) of the women’s income rankings. The city fares better in cost of living, but again trails in pediatricians, violent crimes and spending per pupil.

(via Louisville.com)

It seems obvious to say that education leads to employment, but for anyone who doubts previous studies, the Daily Yonder has a look at rural unemployment rates and how education contributes to a higher rate of joblessness outside of cities.

It makes sense, then, that unemployment would be higher where levels of education are lower. That’s exactly what this chart shows. In fact, the relationship between education and employment is stronger in rural counties than it is in either urban or exurban communities.

The chart shows the difference in education levels between counties that had unemployment rates above the national average in 2009 and those that were below the national average.

The three bars on the left represent the urban, exurban and rural counties that had unemployment rates below 9.3%, the national average in 2009. The bars show the percentage of adults in those counties who have at least a BA degree.

In urban counties with low unemployment rates in 2009, for example, 32.9% of those over 25 years of age had BA degrees. In rural counties, 19.3% of those in low unemployment counties had BA degrees.

On the right, the three bars represent counties with unemployment in 2009 above the national average of 9.3%. As you can see, the percentage of adults in those counties who have at least a BA degree is considerably lower. In high unemployment rural counties, only 14.4% of the adult population has a BA degree, nearly 5 points less than in the low unemployment rural counties.

(link via Rural Blog)

The vote goes on.

From Roll Call:

In the end Bunning agreed to a deal allowing him one vote on an amendment to pay for the bill’s $10 billion cost. That proposal was offered by Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) last Thursday at the start of his filibuster, but Bunning rejected it because he feared his amendment would not pass.

Reid has also agreed to give Bunning two votes on amendments to a larger, one-year extension bill that is currently under consideration in the Senate.

Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said he was pleased a deal could be reached.

“Bunning is coming back now, he has accepted our offer to have one offsetting amendment, which is an offer we made last week, and now he’s accepted it. I think it’s a new offset, we’re waiting to see. So, we’ll see where it goes,” Durbin said. “So it would give us two votes: offset amendment and final passage of the short-term [unemployment insurance].”

The Senate is expected to vote Tuesday night on the short-term bill, which also includes payments for doctors and highway spending as well as other items.

It looks like there’s about to be more tension between Kentucky’s two senators.

From the AP:

THE TOP REPUBLICAN IN THE SENATE IS PREDICTING THAT A STOPGAP MEASURE TO EXTEND HELP FOR THE UNEMPLOYED AND KEEP FEDERAL HIGHWAY DOLLARS FLOWING WILL SOON PASS.

SEN. MITCH MCCONNELL OF KENTUCKY SAYS THAT HE IS WORKING WITH DEMOCRATS TO SET UP A VOTE TO PASS THE LEGISLATION, WHICH HAS BEEN SINGLE-HANDEDLY HELD UP BY SEN. JIM BUNNING, HIS HOMESTATE GOP
COLLEAGUE.

A LAW THAT PROVIDED STOPGAP ROAD FUNDING AND LONGER AND MORE GENEROUS UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND HEALTH INSURANCE SUBSIDIES FOR THE JOBLESS EXPIRED MONDAY. WITHOUT THE EXTENSION, HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF JOBLESS PEOPLE COULD LOSE FEDERAL BENEFITS.

BUNNING HAS BEEN BLOCKING THE BILL BECAUSE IT WOULD ADD $10 BILLION TO THE BUDGET DEFICIT.

Kentucky Senator Jim Bunning was never the face of Senate Republicans, but Politico has a story on how Bunning’s blockage of an extension for unemployment benefits could blow up on the GOP.

Bunning is opposing the $10 billion aid package on the grounds that it isn’t paid for — effectively forcing his Republican colleagues to join him or risk undercutting their own efforts to make Democrats’ deficit spending a centerpiece of their 2010 campaign.

As news of Bunning’s one-man filibuster dominated TV news Monday, Republicans on Capitol Hill were growing increasingly irritated — angry that they were put in a political jam by a retiring Republican senator who has little concern for party politics.

And even some who were sympathetic to Bunning’s efforts sensed the risk that comes with them.

Asked whether this was a debate his party wanted to have right now, with the jobless rate hovering near 10 percent, Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) smiled and said: “You’re a pretty smart guy — I’ll let you use your own judgment on that.”

[edit]

“I think it is pretty clear that Jim Bunning is marching to the beat of his own drum,” said John Feehery, a Washington-based GOP strategist.

Republicans hope to resolve Bunning’s concerns this week so that they can get back to hammering the Democrats on health care. But Bunning has shown few signs of budging; when an ABC News producer tried to talk with the senator Monday, he flipped him the middle finger instead.

Unemployment remains high nationwide and in Kentucky, but Business First says it’s not all bad; some companies are expanding and hiring.

The paper recently checked in with three Louisvillians who were laid off as of February.

There was good news for Shawn Cardwell, formerly an account manager with NB Coating Inc., who landed a new position as a sales representative for Southern Spine LLC.

And Allyson Wolfe, formerly a senior director of human resources for Kindred Healthcare Inc., now serves as director of human resources for Norton Audubon Hospital.

Their stories give a glimmer of hope for job seekers, such as Antia Fields, a former diversity coordinator for Horseshoe Southern Indiana who also was featured in the Feb. 6 issue.

Like thousands of unemployed Americans, Fields said she continues to search for the right opportunity but chose not to elaborate on her job-search process.

Did unemployment really drop? Technically yes, but that doesn’t mean what you might think it means. The Planet Money blog does a good job of breaking it down.

Unemployment is the number of people out of work as a percentage of the total labor force. The labor force in everyone who’s employed or who wants a job. In July, that total labor force fell by 422,000.

Sudeep Reddy at the Wall Street Journal’s Real Time Economics blog says that the jobless number is down because the overall labor force is shrinking — people are giving up on looking for jobs, and so BLS doesn’t count them as unemployed. Reddy also says that when the economy recovers, more people will likely re-enter the labor force and help push the unemployment rate higher.

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